MICF: Daniel Connell Little Aussie Battler

by | Apr 1, 2024

By Carissa Shale

Australian comedian Daniel Connell could be described as the epitome of typical Aussie bloke; carefree, laid-back and loves to tell a good story. As a comedian who has frequented the Melbourne International Comedy Festival since 2011, Connell is an experienced performer, who is clearly comfortable in front of the crowd and presents in a way that is natural and relatable to the audience. Connell’s observational style of comedy saw him explore the current Australian predicament, looking particularly at the youth of today and his concerns for the future. He casts his cynical lens on young love, youth crime, and teenagers in the workforce. A highlight being his retelling of a mediocre experience with Cody, an unfortunate youth working at Footlocker.

Connell is a great storyteller, setting the scene and pulling you in with his facial expressions and precise explanations. His conversational and blazé delivery has an endearing effect, similar to the atmosphere you feel when an old friend is telling a story of their latest antics at a party. However, while Connell sets the scene well, his story arcs could have been explored on a deeper level, strengthening the effect of his punchlines, which sometimes fell short. Furthermore, while his effortless and dry delivery are clearly part of his appeal, on occasion the energy in his performance felt f lat, and left you wanting more.

As most stand-up comedians do, Connell occasionally calls on the audience to fuel material. However, unlike many comedians, Connell does so in a non-confrontational, and respectful manner, leaving audience members feel at ease as they simply become part of the narrative, rather than feeling the embarrassment and dread of being the butt of a joke.

Overall, Daniel Connell’s Little Aussie Battler is a no-frills night of gold old-fashioned stand-up, sure to be a pleasant evening.

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